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Methods to minimize the impacts of fragment collection and maximize production of Bali's endemic coral Acropora suharsonoi transplantation

08 Oct 2018

Methods to minimize the impacts of fragment collection and maximize production of Bali's endemic coral Acropora suharsonoi transplantation

Project Leader: Ms. Widiastuti Karim

University of Origin: Australian National University

Collaborating Organisations: -

Project Locations : Bali  

Activity Type : Public awareness campaign   

Sector : Aquaculture/fisheries 

Project Rationale:

Located in the heart of world coral triangle brings Indonesia the high marine biodiversity and source of endemism, particularly coral organisms. Acropora is the most diverse reef building coral genus with 114 species recognised worldwide and 91 species being identified for the Indonesian archipelago overall (Wallace, 1999). It plays an important role in the reefs structure and abundance of many modern day Indonesian reefs (Boekschoten, et al., 1989; Suharsono, 1992). One of the uncommon and endemic coral species is A. suharsonoi which only found within Lombok and Bali islands. The endemism of this species may due to topography of the region that has strong currents, upwellings of cold water and nutrients from the edge of the Timor Shelf (Wallace et al., 2001). This endemic species is rarely seen and patchy distributed at the reef slope of north Bali island.

Project Description:

The goal of this project is to develop an effective way of transplantation the Bali's endemic coral  A. suharsonoi in order to maintain the sustainability of  coral A. suharsonoi's wild population. It will study  the effect of branch-tip removal from coral parent colonies on the coral production. In addition, this project will raise awareness of environmentally-friendly coral transplantation methods to save the endemic coral. Besides the effect of coral branch-tips removal, this project will also assess the potential negative effects of

transport on branch-tip survivorship.This project will describe several aspects of the coral transplantation approach that demonstrate this methodology. This project will collaborate with traditional local coral farmers in Patas village, Buleleng regency, Bali Province, the only area in this island which is both found the wild population and  transplantation of coral A. suharsonoi.

Project Beneficiaries:

5 traditional coral farmers

Priority Development Area:

Economic institutions and infrastructure        

Links with Australia:

-

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